E&E – Getting to the Truck

The objective here is not to do a gear rating and bashing. I’m complete gear whore, I freely admit to that, but the purpose of this post is to share with my three readers how a glorified tech guy plans on surviving and thriving during adverse conditions.

Depending on what day it is – client meetings, executive playbook, interaction with my betters – will determine my dress. Most of the time this will be some kind of executype business dress – meaning: sport coat, shirt, pants, sans tie. I hate ties. They are a noose of mediocrity. I digress…

Below are my usual pocket contents, though being a knife person, the EDC blade does tend to change. It is one of many and they are similar. Notice the light, Exotac firestarter, and lip balm. Also notice how the lip balm is petroleum jelly and is a rather nice compliment to the Exotac. Get it?

I mentioned in an earlier post that I carry this in my backpack.

Here’s a shot of the thing. It’s a tank, built to take unbelievable amounts abuse:

A note about the carabiners. They are almost as useful as paracord. Besides, chicks dig ’em.

Here’s a content shot:

Notice the fixed blade and embassy pen. I am never without a fixed blade, no matter how small. This is a Bark River Bravo Necker. This is the one I stuck in my hand. Also contained in the bag are:

  • Medkit stocked with first aid gear, BOK, and OTC meds for travel.
  • Q-Tips (ever been on the road, needed one, and didn’t have one? that is a new level of hell.)
  • Accessory kit (yellow flag) containing the detritus of a information worker.
  • Paleo Trail Mix
  • The EDC kit from a few posts ago.
  • A pair of smartwool socks (thought i rarely wear boots and hikers anymore, having a clean pair of socks and drawers is a good thing).
  • Raingear.
  • Stainless water bottle or vacuum bottle – not pictured.

With this kit, I can survive for a couple of days given I can find shelter. Considering that I will be in an urban or suburban environment 99% of the time, that would be a true statement. Though, as I mentioned before, the goal here is not to be Bear Grylls and drink my own urine. The goal is to get to my truck, and in turn, get home.

One last thing not pictured is my sidearm.

Moving on, the truck. 4×4 (is there any other kind), reliable, and paid for. Debt is cancer BTW. Also, not new, trendy, and flashy. Nothing wrong with that, and I would again heartily agree that the concept of the gray man is ludicrous at best. I do however maintain that to be less of a target, you need to not stand out so much.

I have posted a few times on comms. See below:

This radio offers a lot for the investment. Digital for talking around the world and country. Analog for everything else. Lots of features.

Now that we are at the truck, the components for a longer term scenario, plus defense come into play.

Backpack, boots, range bag, toolkit, all on top of a genuine wool blanket.

A word on the redness of the pack. If you as an individual, during a time of crisis, strap on your AR, combat vest, milspec pack with molle attachments, you will not only attract the attention of those around you who are suffering and without, you will also attract the attention of the ones you really have to worry about – dotgov, dotmil, only ones, and their minions.

Contained in the above pack:

  • poncho
  • woobie (poncho liner)
  • 550 cord
  • firekit
  • several MRE’s
  • a really good fixed blade – ESEE6
  • hike stove & isopro
  • change of clothes (cargos, long and short sleeve poly shirts, drawers, socks)

Range bag hold what you think it would. I keep it in here because I never have it when I need it.

One thing you might notice is the ‘toolkit’. See below:

Kel-tec Sub2000 that uses Glock mags. You know, the same kind that feed my daily sidearm.

I’m pretty sure I can hear your inner ninja going, “Pfft, kel-tec. If you were a real tier 1 operator, you would have an SBR AR with an ACOG.”.

See, here’s the thing. I’m not a tier 1 operator. I’m a glorified network administrator who wants to get home to his wife and kids. This setup allows me to do so while still retaining the ability to lay down suppressive fire. Again, while interdiction and engagement are always something to prepare for, it is not the primary objective. The primary objective is to get to the truck and get home to the family and all the preps I have put in place over the years that we have lived there.

Look for the home load out version of this post in a few more days.

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Shoot, Move, Communicate – On the Run

On the move. Saturday’s exercise:

  • fire randomly loaded mag stationary at 60 meters
  • when dry, run to second position, change mag and engage battery before getting to second position, about 40 meters from target
  • fire second randomly loaded mag, when dry rapid change before reaching third target, about 20 meters from target
  • fire third randomly loaded mag, stationary reload, fire fourth randomly loaded mag, transition to sidearm
  • repeat until out of ammo or too tired
  • vary speeds as needed

Clear all jams, ftf’s, misfires, and various malfs. Keep the carbine up in your workspace so you can see downrange. Try not to put a hole in your leg, foot, truck, or anyone else out on the field with you.

It was almost 80 and sunny all day on Saturday. Good times.

EDC Survival Box

My take on this, the Survival loadout.

A couple of operational constraints:

  • I work in a corporate setting in full business dress.
  • I commute from ‘burb to ‘burb everyday, no highway route, about 20 miles.
  • My objective with regard to any challenge would be to get home, not get into a firefight.
  • Interdiction is always a possibility.
  • There is a larger kit with more comprehensive gear in my truck.
  • There is a list of EDC items on my person that compliment the following kit…

I’ll start with the container. Cheap, simple, rugged, water & air tight. Otterbox.

About $11 shipped from somewhere online. Use your GoogleFu. In all honesty it would be a bit better if it were about one inch deeper. I’m sure they make one of those. When I ordered this, it was an afterthought. I had intended to use it for something completely different. Hindsight being 20/20 and all.

Contents are simple:

  • Two CR-123’s as these are the primary batteries for every light I have, including the ones on my weapons. My current EDC light is a 4Sevens, Quarkx123 Tactical. Don’t let the tacticool bit fool you. I could care less about that stuff. The difference with this light is a programming feature that allows for illumination settings to be stored on bezel positions. Very useful.
  • One, KCI Glock mag with 124-gr JHPs.
  • Twenty odd feet of 550 cord and a ring.
  • Light My Fire Ferro Rod with a secondary ferro from an ESEE survival kit.
  • Opinel Number 9 carbon steel folder – about $10 and one seriously capable blade.

Below is a shot of the packed kit.

Complete? Nope. Does it work for me? Yep. With my EDC gear and this, I could get home. That’s the goal. Could it stand a revision, say, addition of water purification tabs? Probably. I have some. I will likely shoehorn them in at some point.

Again, this is about complimenting what’s on my person, and giving me assets to help me get home, or get to the bigger kit in my truck.

I hope some of you find this info useful. There will be a series of posts soon that will detail the EDC pack loadout, the truck kit, and to satisfy a request from Mr. Kerodin, a SHTF E&E kit with weapons.