The One Hundred Mile Rule

Before embarking on this, I want to be honest and up front. I did not come up with this, and it is not a Matson original. I read it on a prepper blog about three or four years ago, and despite my GoogleFoo, I am unable to find it. Please, if you find the original author, leave the link in the comments so that I can give proper credit.

The rule itself is simple:

When traveling by vehicle more than one hundred miles from your home AO, you must have a long gun.

It doesn’t matter what that long gun is, just have one. Whether it is a .22lr, a pump 12 gauge, or a SBR AR15 is really unimportant. What is critical is that you have it in your vehicle and have an intimate knowledge of how to properly use it.

Here’s mine:

I have successfully, and repeatedly hit soda cans at 100 to 125 yards with this little Sub2000 in 9mm. While that is not a rifle round at rifle velocities, it is a very long reach and extremely high capacity (notice the eeeevil 30 rounders) weapon in a very, very small package.

Keep this rule in mind the next time you fire up the minivan for a trip to grandmas.

 

 

E&E – Getting to the Truck

The objective here is not to do a gear rating and bashing. I’m complete gear whore, I freely admit to that, but the purpose of this post is to share with my three readers how a glorified tech guy plans on surviving and thriving during adverse conditions.

Depending on what day it is – client meetings, executive playbook, interaction with my betters – will determine my dress. Most of the time this will be some kind of executype business dress – meaning: sport coat, shirt, pants, sans tie. I hate ties. They are a noose of mediocrity. I digress…

Below are my usual pocket contents, though being a knife person, the EDC blade does tend to change. It is one of many and they are similar. Notice the light, Exotac firestarter, and lip balm. Also notice how the lip balm is petroleum jelly and is a rather nice compliment to the Exotac. Get it?

I mentioned in an earlier post that I carry this in my backpack.

Here’s a shot of the thing. It’s a tank, built to take unbelievable amounts abuse:

A note about the carabiners. They are almost as useful as paracord. Besides, chicks dig ’em.

Here’s a content shot:

Notice the fixed blade and embassy pen. I am never without a fixed blade, no matter how small. This is a Bark River Bravo Necker. This is the one I stuck in my hand. Also contained in the bag are:

  • Medkit stocked with first aid gear, BOK, and OTC meds for travel.
  • Q-Tips (ever been on the road, needed one, and didn’t have one? that is a new level of hell.)
  • Accessory kit (yellow flag) containing the detritus of a information worker.
  • Paleo Trail Mix
  • The EDC kit from a few posts ago.
  • A pair of smartwool socks (thought i rarely wear boots and hikers anymore, having a clean pair of socks and drawers is a good thing).
  • Raingear.
  • Stainless water bottle or vacuum bottle – not pictured.

With this kit, I can survive for a couple of days given I can find shelter. Considering that I will be in an urban or suburban environment 99% of the time, that would be a true statement. Though, as I mentioned before, the goal here is not to be Bear Grylls and drink my own urine. The goal is to get to my truck, and in turn, get home.

One last thing not pictured is my sidearm.

Moving on, the truck. 4×4 (is there any other kind), reliable, and paid for. Debt is cancer BTW. Also, not new, trendy, and flashy. Nothing wrong with that, and I would again heartily agree that the concept of the gray man is ludicrous at best. I do however maintain that to be less of a target, you need to not stand out so much.

I have posted a few times on comms. See below:

This radio offers a lot for the investment. Digital for talking around the world and country. Analog for everything else. Lots of features.

Now that we are at the truck, the components for a longer term scenario, plus defense come into play.

Backpack, boots, range bag, toolkit, all on top of a genuine wool blanket.

A word on the redness of the pack. If you as an individual, during a time of crisis, strap on your AR, combat vest, milspec pack with molle attachments, you will not only attract the attention of those around you who are suffering and without, you will also attract the attention of the ones you really have to worry about – dotgov, dotmil, only ones, and their minions.

Contained in the above pack:

  • poncho
  • woobie (poncho liner)
  • 550 cord
  • firekit
  • several MRE’s
  • a really good fixed blade – ESEE6
  • hike stove & isopro
  • change of clothes (cargos, long and short sleeve poly shirts, drawers, socks)

Range bag hold what you think it would. I keep it in here because I never have it when I need it.

One thing you might notice is the ‘toolkit’. See below:

Kel-tec Sub2000 that uses Glock mags. You know, the same kind that feed my daily sidearm.

I’m pretty sure I can hear your inner ninja going, “Pfft, kel-tec. If you were a real tier 1 operator, you would have an SBR AR with an ACOG.”.

See, here’s the thing. I’m not a tier 1 operator. I’m a glorified network administrator who wants to get home to his wife and kids. This setup allows me to do so while still retaining the ability to lay down suppressive fire. Again, while interdiction and engagement are always something to prepare for, it is not the primary objective. The primary objective is to get to the truck and get home to the family and all the preps I have put in place over the years that we have lived there.

Look for the home load out version of this post in a few more days.